Corruption Perceptions Index Worldwide

The Corruption Perceptions Index measures the perceived levels of public sector corruption worldwide based on expert opinion. The last results confirm that corruption among public institutions and employees is still common. Sixty-eight per cent of countries worldwide have a serious corruption problem. No country, anywhere in the world, is corruption-free.

The countries who had the highest rate are Danmark (92), New Zeland (91), Finland (89), Sweden (87), Norway, Svizzera, Singapore, Netherland. The worst situation is in Somalia, North Corea, Sudan, Afghanistan, Sud Sudan, Iraq, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Libia and Eritrea.

More countries improved their scores in 2015: signal that people working together can succeed in fighting corruption. Countries such as Greece, Senegal and the UK improved in recent years (since 2012). Others, including Australia, Brazil, Libya, Spain and Turkey, have deteriorated. Five of the 10 most corrupt countries also rank among the 10 least peaceful places in the world: in Afghanistan, for examples, millions of dollars (that should have gone on reconstruction) have been reportedly wasted or stolen.

Performances are often influenced by levels of inequality and poverty. In Angola, 70 per cent of the population live on 2 dollars a day or less. One in six children die before the age of five – making it the deadliest place in the world to be a child. More than 150,000 children die each year. Under these conditions corruption growths.

But corruption is a problem even in rich countries. Half of the G20 are among them. Corruption is a problem in Europe. Even if four of the top five countries are in Northern Europe that doesn’t mean much: countries that has a clean public sector, can be linked to corruption elsewhere. Such as Sweden, third in the index: in this country Swedish-Finnish firm TeliaSonera (37 per cent owned by the Swedish state) is facing allegations that it paid millions of dollars in bribes to secure business in Uzbekistan. This is not the only one: half of all OECD countries are violating their international obligations to crack down on bribery by their companies abroad.

In this list, Italy is 61st, but some European countries are worst: UK, for example, is 78th (was 74th in 2012 and 76th in 2013).

C.Alessandro Mauceri


C. Alessandro Mauceri
C. Alessandro Mauceri
Since thirty years C.Alessandro Mauceri deals, writes and talks about issues related to the environment and a sustainable development, as well as internationalization. He is author of several books, including Water War and Finta Democracy. His research and papers were reported in several newspapers, in Italy and abroad.Posts

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